Families

Infertility: Where to get your questions answered

Infertility: Where to get your questions answered

After ten years of trying, Anne Belden finally gave birth to a son in the early 1990s. Six years later, she and her husband John adopted a daughter.

Today, there are a lot more treatment options for infertility than Anne had 30 years ago, and success rates for conceiving are much higher. Thanks to the Internet, there is also a wider support network and better opportunities to access the latest information. Something else that is different is more women are waiting longer to start their families, which increases their risk of infertility problems. Read more.

Brain Injury: From Surviving to Thriving

Brain Injury: From Surviving to Thriving

Hilary Zayed had to reinvent herself after she fell off her horse several years ago and suffered a traumatic brain injury. She used to be an elementary school teacher, but her brain can no longer handle the sensory input — bells ringing, children walking and talking, all the hub bub that normally happens in an elementary school. So, teaching is out for Hilary, along with some other things that were an integral part of her life. "I was a horseback rider, that's out," she says. "The neurologist says one more fall, it will kill me. I was a flute player and now can't stand the sound. Gone.

What is Mesothelioma?

What is Mesothelioma?

No doubt you've seen commercials about mesothelioma and know that it is usually caused by exposure to asbestos and that there a lots of law firms in the country eager to represent victims. Have you ever met someone with mesothelioma? I haven't, but I was recently contacted by Cameron Von St. James, whose wife Heather was diagnosed with it seven years ago. He wanted to know if I would be interested in sharing their story on my Catching Health blog. At my request, he sent me additional information. When I started reading it, I quickly realized that they both write for a mesothelioma web site sponsored by a law firm, which raised a red flag for me. I told him so and decided that I needed to think carefully about how to proceed. My conclusion was Heather Von St.

Easter approaches and that means KOLACH!

Easter approaches and that means KOLACH!

As Easter approaches I begin to gear up for the food traditions we have in my family.  Sometimes I get a bit of a head start and so I decided to back Kolach this weekend.  Kolach is a sweet festival bread that is filled with different types of fillings.  See how I make this bread at Nate's Kitchen by clicking the link below!

NATE'S KITCHEN-Kolach!

 

The recipe comes from my Grandmother who was Slovakian.  Sadly she passed away in the Fall of last year so making Kolach this time was a little bitter sweet.  But making traditional food is what connects us to our past and our loved ones.  In fact the message of Easter encourages us that even though death may come, there can be hope in resurection! 

 

CARING FOR A LOVED ONE WITH DEMENTIA\FREE WORKSHOP

CARING FOR A LOVED ONE WITH DEMENTIA\FREE WORKSHOP

Ballet Dancers Team up With Children’s Author to Bring Performances to Students

Ballet Dancers Team up With Children’s Author to Bring Performances to Students

Two of the best creative arts for kids – ballet and children’s books – come together this spring during an hour-long program for elementary school students in Gorham, Portland and Scarborough.

Young dancers from Maine State Ballet in Falmouth are teaming up with picture book author David Ira Rottenberg to create unique performances for the students. The author will read his book, Gwendolyn, the Graceful Pig, while the ballerinas dance and act out the story. It tells the tale of Gwendolyn, who longs to dance ballet, and her friend Omar, whose dream is to play football. After the performances, the Maine State Ballet dancers and the author will answer questions from students.

Performances will be held on March 27 at Blue Point, Eight Corners and Pleasant Hill primary schools in Scarborough; and on April 11 at Hall and Reiche elementary schools in Portland, and at Great Falls Elementary School in Gorham.

Help Celebrate St. Patrick's Day Early and Help Children With Special Needs in Maine

Help Celebrate St. Patrick's Day Early and Help Children With Special Needs in Maine

The 2nd annual Robbie Foundation Benefit Night will be held Friday, March 15th at the Local Sprouts Cafe, 649 Congress Street in Portland. The festivities will get underway at 5 p.m. and will feature live music from Chris Pulsini and Tommy Bolster, a silent auction featuring art pieces created by artists from Brunswick's SunTide Studios, and a St. Patty's Day Basket Raffle.

In Maine, where one in ten kids has a disability. All of the proceeds from the event will go to provide children and youth with developmental disabilities in Maine, with therapy treatments, services and adaptive equipment that is not covered by insurance. Over the past two years, the Robbie Foundation, a Scarborough based non-profit, has donated more than $40,000 in services and equipment to dozens of special needs kids throughout the state.